Internet Decisisions

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May 2006: Herndon Joins Advisory Board of CommuniteySM

Atlanta, GA (May 15, 2006) - Keith Herndon, president of Internet Decisions, LLC, has joined the advisory board of CommuniteySM, a new company with a unique approach to online social networking.

Following the explosive popularity of social networking websites aimed at teens and young adults (e.g. My Space, Xanga, and Facebook) Atlanta Internet and media executive Michael Q. Parker, launched the company as a web-based community resourcing service. Communitey (www.communitey.net), pronounced "commun-a-tay" launched on May 2, 2006. The service partners with local faith-based (e.g. churches, synagogues, service groups), educational (e.g. private schools), and affinity groups (e.g. business associations, college alumni clubs) allowing its adult, primarily 25-60 year old, members the opportunity to connect with each other and exchange both personal and professional resources.

Internet Decisions assisted Parker and his team with technology and strategic planning in preparing for the launch of the business. "We needed Internet Decisions to help us get this venture launched, and we will continue to rely on them for advice and guidance as we grow the business," said Parker. "I'm delighted that Keith will be part of our formal advisory board. His understanding of the Internet marketplace will be an invaluable resource for us."

According to Parker, CommuniteySM is the first true community resourcing service. "Community resourcing is significantly different from social networking," he points out. Internet social networking sites, popular with teens and young adults, facilitate the sharing of ones experiences, likes, and dislikes with a network of acquaintances or total strangers. However, 'community resourcing' provides the functionality for members of a specific group/organization to exchange information, goods, and services within a closed environment amongst themselves. This experience benefits both the group and individuals where they build stronger bonds and enjoy a greater degree of comfort from interacting with people who belong to the same group. Parker explains the name, Communitey, comes from the mission to create an electronic community that empowers, engages, and encourages exchange between the members of each group. "In addition, 'unite' is at the core of what we do. We help form stronger connections between group members ultimately creating stronger local communities," said Parker.